Is Food Combining A Sham?

Some form of food combining has been included in many different approaches to health over the years, but in 1951 Herbert M. Shelton brought it to the attention of the general public with the publication of his booklet, Food Combining Made Easy. Later, Harvey and Marilyn Diamond made a strong case for food combining in their bestseller Fit For Life, published in 1985. Its proponents claim that combining foods in a specific way promotes easier digestion, helps the body maintain its ideal weight, and results in greater energy and a sense of well-being. But does it really work?

Although there appears to be no scientific evidence to support the practice, many people sing its praises, from health practitioners to popular health and personal development writers like Suzanne Somers and Anthony Robbins. Perhaps the easiest way to decide if food combining is for you is to take it for a test run and notice how your body responds.

Here are the basic principles of food combining:

1. Vegetables combine well with all other food categories, with the exception of fruits which should be eaten alone.


VEGETABLES

Non-Starch
Asparagus
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Celery
Chard
Chicory
Collard Greens
Cucumber
Dandelion
Eggplant
Endive
Escarole
Green Beans
Kale
Kohlrab
Okra
Parsnip
Rutabaga
Spinach
Sprouts
Summer Squash
Green Peppers
Tomatoes
Turnips
Water Cress
Zucchini

Mild Starch
Artichokes
Beets
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery Root
Corn
Mushrooms
Peas


Irritants
Garlic
Onion
Leeks
Radishes
Scallions
Shallots



2. The two most concentrated foods - proteins and starches - should NOT be eaten at the same meal.
PROTEIN
Meat
Fowl
Fish
Eggs
Dairy Products

Soybeans
Legumes
Nuts
Seeds
Yogurt
STARCH
Biscuits
Breads
Cereals
Crackers
Dried Beans

Grains
Pasta
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Squash (winter)

3. Fats and oils combine well with starches and vegetables, but not with protein. If you must have fats with protein, offset it with a green vegetable salad.
FATS
Avocado
Butter
Cream
Lard


Olives
Margarine
Sour Cream

OILS
Avocado
Canola
Corn
Nut
Olive

Safflower
Sesame
Soy
Sunflower

4. Fruit should be eaten alone, preferably on an empty stomach or 3 hours after eating. After you've eaten fruit, wait 20-30 minutes before consuming any other food.


FRUIT

Acidic
Blackberries
Grapefruit
Kumquat
Lemon
Lime
Orange
Pineapple
Plums
Pomegranate
Raspberries
Strawberries
Tangerines
Tangelos


Sub-Acidic
Apple
Apricot
Blueberries
Cherries
Figs
Grapes
Kiwi Fruit
Loquats
Nectarines
Papaya
Peach
Pear
Plums (Sweet)


Sweet
Bananas
Dates
Dried Fruit
Grapes
Persimmon
Melon
Cantaloupe
Casaba
Honeydew
Musk
Watermelon



5. Drink liquids in between meals, never during or immediately after, as this dilutes the digestive juices.

If you're curious about food combining, you can learn more from clicking on the link below. Or you can follow the basic principles for a week or two and make note of any changes you experience as a result.

Click here to visit our Food Combining Resources.

> > Printer Friendly Food Combining Chart


Disclaimer:
It's important that you consult with a qualified health professional before embarking on any new dietary or exercise regimen.

Gathering information online is fine for research purposes, but you need a real live professional to monitor your progress if you attempt to make drastic changes to your lifestyle. Unless you're a health professional yourself, you aren't equipped to objectively observe your body's responses to a new diet or exercise program. So whatever your chosen course of action, please be sure you enlist the support of a qualified professional.

Read our full Disclaimer here.